Quine's The Ways of Paradox and ]

Since coherentism can be construed in different ways, it is unlikelythat there is one single objection that succeeds in refuting allpossible versions of coherentism. Doxastic coherentism, however, seemsparticularly vulnerable to criticism coming from the foundationalistcamp. One of these we considered already: It would seem that doxasticcoherentism makes excessive intellectual demands on believers. Whendealing with the mundane tasks of everyday life, we don't normallybother to form beliefs about the explanatory coherence of our beliefsor the reliability of our belief sources. According to a secondobjection, doxastic coherentism fails by being insensitive to theepistemic relevance of perceptual experiences. Foundationalists couldargue as follows. Suppose Kim is observing a chameleon that rapidlychanges its colors. A moment ago it was blue, now it's purple. Kimstill believes it's blue. Her belief is now unjustified because shebelieves the chameleon is blue even though it looks purple toher. Then the chameleon changes its color back to blue. Now Kim'sbelief that the chameleon is blue is justified again because thechameleon once again looks blue to her. The point would bethat what's responsible for the changing justificatory status of Kim'sbelief is solely the way the chameleon looks to her. Since doxasticcoherentism does not attribute epistemic relevance to perceptualexperiences by themselves, it cannot explain why Kim's belief is firstjustified, then unjustified, and eventually justified again.[]

Quine's The Ways of Paradox and ]

Home page for Willard Van Orman Quine, mathematician and philosopher who held the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard University from 1956-2000. Over the last half century his literary output was prodigious in such areas as mathematical logic, set theory, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of logic. His best known works include "The Ways of Paradox", "Mathematical Logic", "Set Theory and Its Logic", "Quiddities", and his most influential "Word and Object". His style is not only eminently lucid but lively and elegant. Professor Quine was born June 25, 1908 (anti-Christmas) and (Christmas). His ashes rest beside his parents' remains in the Glendale Cemetary, Akron, Ohio with portions scattered in Cambridge MA, Harvard MA, and Meriden CT (with his wife, Marjorie). The last paper he presented was in Boston (August 1998); it was published in . [from "Essays on the Philosophy of W. V. Quine"]

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Quine's The Ways of Paradox and ]

Quine's The Ways of Paradox and ]

First published in 1980 – and reissued here with a feisty new introductory essay – launched Parker J. Palmer s career as an author and his ongoing exploration of the contradictions that vex and enrich our lives. In this probing and heartfelt book, the distinguished writer, teacher, and activist examines some of the challenging questions at the core of Christian spirituality. How do we live with the apparent opposition between good and evil, scarcity and abundance, individuality and community, death and new life? We can hold them as paradoxes, not “either/ors”, allowing them to open our minds and hearts to new ways of seeing and being.


Ways of Paradox & Other Essays Revised Edition: …

Yet another important source of externalist proclivities in twentiethcentury philosophy lies in the thought that the meaningfulness of aspeaker’s utterances depends on its potential intelligibility tohearers: language must be public—an idea that has foundvarying and influential expression in the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein,W.V.O. Quine, and Donald Davidson. This, coupled with the assumptionthat intentionality (or “thought” in the broad (Cartesian)sense) must be expressible in language, has led some to conclude thatwhat determines the content of one’s mind must lie in theexternal conditions that enable others to attribute that content.

Quine ways of paradox and other essays online - FCC …

Quine's The Ways of Paradox ; translated into Italian by Bruno Garofalo and reprinted as in Bruno Garofalo (editor) Lezioni di filosofia del linguaggio (Napoli: Casa Editrice Didasco: 1980)]